Thursday, March 09, 2006

Reader input

Okay, readers, since you are a very knowledgeable and august body of knitters (read: I'm sucking up), I would like to ask for your input on something. I am toying with the idea of selling some of my hand-dyed yarns and rovings, now that I'm getting a bit better at the process. Here are some examples of the most recent stuff I've done.

Lace-weight wool, in shades of sage with a little yellow and a little teal:



And some roving:







What I ask from you, dear readers, is for you to kindly tell me your druthers: what do you think? what weights of yarn do you think are most tempting: lace weight, sock yarn, DK, bulkier than that? What about roving: any specific breeds (Blue-faced Leicester? Corriedale? Targhee?)? What colors do you find most tempting? What colors do you like but are hardest to find? Any other suggestions you'd like to share? Feel free to use the comments section or you can email me privately via the link over to the right. I thank you for your help, and for your honesty.

25 comments:

bluecanary said...

Well, I am not a spinner, so I can't comment on the roving. But for yarn, sock yarn is low commitment, as you don't have to buy a lot to have a project. And I wish there was more self striping sock yarn in deep, vibrant colorways. Especially in "off" colors -- with brown or black added in - you know, Fall colors. Seems to me that there's plenty of varigated sock yarns to choose from... Also, I knit a ton in DK weight for kids, my favorite is the 50/50 wool/cotton blend. It would be great to see more hand dyed yarn in this fiber/weight, especially like, kettle dyed solids -- that would be so fun!

Peatbogfaery said...

Decent purple colours are hard to come by. And I would look for lace weight. Hope this helps, good luck :) http://www.theswitchboards.com/switchboards_home.html - this site might be useful to you

Stacey said...

I like the DK weight too - even for socks for the hubby. I can't find too much in the more "manly" tones that would work for him. Oranges arent' that common either, I usually snatch them up when I find them!

Janice in GA said...

I'm a laceweight yarn ho. But most laceweight patterns don't look that great in variegated yarns. I wonder if some very subtle color shading in lace weight would look good?

Also, (and this is just MHO), I think hand-dyed yarns display better in a skein than in a ball.

Ar in Rainy Seattle said...

As a spinner and lover of green, I'll vote for targhee roving and greens of all colors: light greens and dark greens, greens together and solid greens. Have you ever noticed how hard it is to find a nice array of green rovings? Believe it. Green. yum. mee. Nice dye job on the other colors, and lets see some green!

Kathy Merrick said...

Funny how we tend to see lack in terms of what we love.
I'd've said there's no end of purple hand-dyed yarn, and yet the second commenter sees nowhere near enough purple.
How about some yellow shades, for us jaunatre (add a circonflex)fans?

And, yeah baby, Targhee wool and Blue-faced Leicester.
Gorgeous stuff there, ma mie.

Zooks said...

I'll be echoing some of what's already been said!

I have a hard time finding sock weight yarn that is 100% natural fibers. I do like the crazy colors but it's so hard to find the navy or black sock weight for my husband. I'd really love to find a reliable source of 100% wool or cotton sock yarn in all sorts of colors including the "dull and boring" ones.

I'd love to find some sock weight yarn in a fiber that isn't bothersome to those with wool allergies. My poor grandma and sister have yet to get a pair of handmade socks from me! :-(

I also love lace weight with subtle variegation which can be hard to find (Lorna's Laces Old Rose comes to mind, but hard to find).

Finally, I would like to have a source of DK weight yarn in natural fibers for babies. It seems like baby yarns in the standard pastel variegations are available only in acrylic. :-(

Gail said...

I tend to buy sock yarn in variegated colors - its hard to commit to a whole sweater worth of variegated, but heck, if the socks flash and look funky, well, I'll just wear them with boots.

Cynthia said...

sock weight and lace weight are my interests. Colors--I am a blue, grey, black, wine, deep green person. I could not would not spin a yarn--so no comments on the roving (although, my cat loves the leftovers from my one attempt--perhaps he would like some color?)

Tracy said...

I'm a lace weight addict who is developing a side addiction to sock weight. I am a black, wine(in a glass, directly from the bottle, whatever ;-) ), purple, pink, charcoal girl. Haven't spun a thing but the roving looks lovely.

Sarah R said...

Another not-a-spinner here, so I won't comment on the roving.

I love sock yarn and it always seems more affordable as you don't need as much of it. And I agree that lace weight should be very subtly variegated....otherwise it overwhelms the lace pattern.

I would love some worsted weight in very subtle colors...like the solid Koigu skeins that, when you look at them closely, have slight shadings of color.

Another thing I like in variegated worsted weight yarn are very short stretches of color so that stripiness is kept to a minimum and you get more of a speckled effect.

And I love all colors...though it does seem hard right now to find yellow/orange combinations.

Mindy said...

I'm stuck in a sock phase, so that's my first choice anymore. Also, like most everyone said w/ the laceweight, very subtle shadings within the same color. Though, in a simple pattern, more colorful yarn may work- you'd probably want to knit up a sample so people could see that.

Rovings- my personal fav is merino. I'm not a "warm" color fan, but your orangey/peachy roving is calling me.

I think your best bet would be variety- and experiment outside your color comfort zone- I've gotten some pleasant surprises doing that.

Rana said...

I like sock weight and DK weight, but I'm far more willing to splurge on an untried yarn in sock weight -- the commitment is so much less.

I second the appeal of greens, especially leaf greens, intense dark greens, and clear greens in general (versus muddy yellowed greens or blue-greens). Russets and browns are also nice, and often hard to find in sock weights.

Hard to offer an opinion on the roving... I'm a spindle spinner, and a few ounces tends to turn into a life-time supply, as I am such a slow and sporadic spinner!

Sara J. said...

I'd have to agree with the sock knitters -- the hand-dyed sock yarn market is pretty good these days.

For roving, I personally prefer darker, more muted colors, like your purple. Most dyers aren't doing it.

Barb B. said...

In roving I am colour junky magpie and anything weird I'll buy. (my supplier knows now to wave them at me)
I strongly agree with Janice that the hand dyed display better in the skein. Friends who sell it sell way more displayed that way.
Barb B.

sherry said...

Green yarn!
Green! Lovely mossy greens, earth toned greens, greens going to blues. Keep the values similar, so the knitting shows up!

Kelly said...

I say there isn't enough hand dyed yarn in dk and worsted weights. Eggplant purples, blood reds, and very rich, vibrant colors really appeal to me. If you really get good at this spinning, maybe you can feature machine washable yarns too. Truthfully, I wasn't too fond of the colors on the skeins that you placed on your blog, but I must say that you are on the right track.

Carla said...

Bring on the sock yarn!

Deborah C. said...

I WANT that purple roving! Lace weight, sock weight, and also bulky/super bulky are wonderful, and I like merino, Cormo, anything soft and silky. You could keep it as roving for me too... I like your color values, they blend together really nicely. I'm not so much of an orange/yellow fan (it makes me look jaundiced), but the blue/teal/green was pretty, too, and I also really like the pink/red/blue - I think that would spin up really nicely with long repeats if you did it as a fine yarn.

j. said...

Another vote for tonal, subtle variegations, DK-to-worsted weight, and muddy and olive greens.

But not socks. I usually prefer to buy enough for a sweater.

anmiryam said...

Sock yarn please. I love knitting socks from yarn dyed by individuals. I also buy it compulsively with greater regularity than I knit it. There's always room for another ball of sock yarn (or 20) in my house. Looking at all those lovely little hanks seems less intimidating than gazing at a sweater project waiting for me quit my job and knit full time.

Michelene said...

How about some graduated colors--from indigo depths to glacier blue, saffron through pale pansy, cabernet through virgin's blush?
I think graduations of color could work in anything from lace weight for shawls(I'm imagining Lotus Blossom, which I still haven't started, in those blues) to bulky for scarves (how about a commie reds cable scarf).
I think you should add the disclaimer that the yarn will self destruct if it's stranded with Fun Fur.

Rana said...

Ooh. I hadn't thought about graduated colors -- michelene, that's genius!

Liz said...

another vote for sock yarn - it doesn't require a lot of yardage, so it's an easy "ooo gotta have it" thing. Deep, rich, fun colors rule!

aija said...

Its all about sock yarn for me, its so versatile and as another commenter said... low commitment. Splurging on a $20 pair of socks isn't as much of a jump as a sweater's worth of yarn. My own desire for colors? Less bright, less "kool-aidy"... unless you add a dark color (brown/black) to offset the lite-bright colors. I'm always a sucker for orange and when blue is paired with orange...!!! Good luck on your endeavors!