Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Happy National Coming Out Day!

It was called to my attention this morning that today is National Coming Out Day. This day is part of an "on-going campaign to empower gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and allied Americans to live openly and honestly about their lives."



I always feel a little bit goofy getting on my soapbox about the need for respect and equality for GLBT folks in this country and world, mainly because I'm a soccer mom, suburban-living heterosexual and I don't want to come across as a poseur. But I strongly believe that the fight for GLBT rights is the civil rights struggle of my generation (well, okay, we need more work on civil rights, too but today people generally give at least lip service to racial equality, and it's enshrined in our laws).

So to my gay, lesbian, transgendered and/or bisexual friends and readers, I say "Rock on." This heterosexual, suburb-dwelling soccer mom is behind you 150%.

24 comments:

Rebecca said...

Thnx. You rock. Well said. Green yarn. (hey, it's important too!)

Cynthia said...

Another suburban living woman (no kids) saying come-on-out, you are welcome in my world and I will not tolerate people who feel differently in my world....

Joe said...

This big homo sends a big note of thanks. It will be nice when the concept of "coming out" is no longer a big event for anyone, or better yet, unnecessary.

When folks are free to date, have sex with, marry, love anyone they want, it won't be necessary to come out of a place where you've never felt it necessary to stay.

Happy Coming Out Day to you too.

Molly said...

Yes!

For a Bryn Mawr student, this is a particularly excellent week, because we have a tradition around Coming Out Day. Students (with the Rainbow Alliance group on campus) write up thoughts, feelings, and jokes about their sexualities (everything from "I'm a girly girl who likes other girly girls" to "We shouldn't have to be brave") on trangular pieces of construction paper and tie them up all over campus, where everyone walking by can get a glimpse into what it's like to feel different even at a liberal women's college.

It's a great tradition, and I sometimes think that the country might be able to identify better with "minority issues" they think are so different from their own if they were confronted with a simple "AIDS is not a gay disease" or "I'm bi, not confused" triangle in their day-to-day lives.

Franklin said...

Oh my gosh. I totally forgot.

Thank you for the nice write-up. I get very warm and fuzzy when people from outside the camp help move the cause forward.

This gay dude sends you a kiss. You rock.

Cortster said...

Wow, I didn't even know there was such a thing as Coming Out day.

As a mom of a beautiful, intelligent, witty, artist lesbian and, I think the term is, mother-out-of-law of an also beautiful, intelligent, witty, artist and social activist lesbian, thanks for the reminder!

I'm looking forward to the day when they can feel comfortable walking hand-in-hand down the very street I live on here in the very Red state of Virginia. Until that time they will have to find their bliss in New York City and we all will have to keep fighting ignorance, fear and hate wherever we find it.

Liz K. said...

This straight married suburban mom stands with our GLBT

JoVE said...

The heterosexual woman who is the president of our local Integrity chapter (an Anglican LGBT rights group) gave the sermon on the Sunday when Pride happened here. She made a very good case for why straight folks not only could be but should be LGBT rights activists. I think the sermon is available online (I haven't checked but they have a habit of posting them, and have recently started posting audio recordings) and I could point you to it if you are interested.

M-H said...

Thanks Carol. Things are much better than they were, at least for those of us who can speak openly about our relationships at work, on our blogs and to our families. But of course there's a way to go, especially with legal recognition, in many places.

Carol said...

Hey Franklin -- that kiss you sent me: is it with, or without, tongue?

Leanne said...

What a wonderful post, Carol. Things have changed so much in the 20-some years since I first came out, especially here in Canada where I was able to legally marry my same-sex spouse 3 years ago, after 12 years together.

Unfortunately, sometimes coming out is a continuing process. My partner has recently come out as trans, which means I now need to "come out" as "straight", after 20 years of being out as a lesbian :-) And I can't yet talk about my husband on my blog, as we haven't yet told my mother, and she reads my blog :-) - so I'm back to referring to my partner without the use of pronouns. Hopefully not for long!

Thanks for reminding people that there are still people struggling for rights and recognition.

Deborah C. said...

This hetero suburban soccer mom also supports our GLBT friends. I hope someday soon it won't matter what sex the person you love is, just that you love someone and they love you back. Discrimination is such an UGLY thing.

JJ said...

Don't you think it's a little sad that we need to have a National Coming Out day? Every day should be coming out day, mother's day, father's day, love your pet day, whatever. We should be open and accepting of everyone every single day.

Anonymous said...

my best friend of 38 years is gay. I would not trade his friendship for anyone or anything in the world. no other friend has been with me this long.

this hetero married suburban woman looks forward to the day when NO ONE will be judged and EVERYONE will be accepted for the great person they are. ignorance is not bliss; it is judgmental, bigoted, insensitive, intolerant, and hateful.

stop hating; increase the peace.

anne marie in philly

mindy said...

You guys have about said it all- rock on all of you! I still remember the day my brother "came out" to me about himself and his partner. Being a smart-alecky teenager, I said, "Well, duh. Should this be a problem?" It didn't phase me, but it was only much later when it dawned on me how difficult it had been for him. So here's another heterosexual, farm-dwelling soccer mom right there behind you too. May the day come when noone is phased.

kmkat said...

Right on! from a hetero, married, mother of 2 (apparently) hetero sons, living in rural WI.

Mel said...

Like Franklin, I had also forgotten. It's what happens, I suppose, when you live in a place where it's a complete non-issue.

It'll be nice when Coming Out Day is unnecessary everywhere. In the meantime, we're so happy to have allies like you. Kisses from me, too. No tongues, though. That's reserved for David.

Carol said...

I'm just hoping someday, no one has a "day" and everyone can focus on real issues. Like proctecting our countries from others who want to destroy us all just because we are. I mean really! if I were queasy about this stuff, I'd be missing out on quite a few terriffic friendships that are treasured.
A hetro in a metro who just wants to like folks for who "they" are.

Anonymous said...

This het married grandma in CT is wishing for that "someday" when no special days are needed. A nephew and 2 nieces never had qualms about being out. But I have a step brother, now in his 40's, who's never been able to acknowledge what the entire family knows and accepts. So sad.

Because I'm pretty much white and my husband is Asian, our children had to endure alot of racist shit as children until we moved to San Franciso where it their "race" was irrelevent. Someday...

Jude in obscureknitty

Norskybear said...

I figured that today is as good a day as any to let you all know that it's about time that I tell you that I'm gay.

Glad I got that little secret off my chest.

Carol said...

Let's just keep in mind, Lars, that it's "Coming Out" Day, not "Putting Out" day.

Sherry W said...

awww, Carol, can't it be both???

Why some fear the love between two people is beyond me. I think this is an issue everyone needs to speak out on, no matter who you are shagging.

Anonymous said...

Thanks from a bi girl stranded at a cow college in Ohio...the words of solidarity from an ally were much needed!

Heather

Cindy G said...

A big thank you and "Amen" from an over fifty (can you say "old lady knitter"?), heterosexual mom living in a rural community in Midwest. It isn't who you love that matters, it's how well you love them.