Wednesday, January 10, 2007

December book report

1. Rituals of the Season (Deborah Knott Mysteries), by Margaret Maron. Another in her Deborah Knott mystery series.

2. A Fountain Filled With Blood (A Rev. Clare Ferguson Mystery) by Julia Spencer-Fleming. Another in her Clare Fergusson mystery series.

3. Thunderstruck by Erik Larsen. The book traces two seemingly unrelated events, Marconi's development of wireless radio and the murder committed by Dr. H.H. Crippen. There is a connection, though; Crippen and his girlfriend were captured on a ship steaming to America from Europe after the wireless transmitted information about the fugitives to ship captains. I have to confess that I skimmed through a lot of the Marconi stuff; way too technical and dull. This one could have used a really good edit; Devil and the White City was much better.

4. A Bitter Feast (A Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novel) by S.J. Rozan. A new-to-me mystery series involving a Chinese-American private eye named Lydia Chin. Good escapist reading, which is mostly what I've been doing these days. Also, since every other scene involves someone, somewhere sitting down to a bowl of noodles or a cup of jasmine tea, it made me crave Chinese food.

5. Stop Dressing Your Six-Year-Old Like a Skank: And Other Words of Delicate Southern Wisdom by Celia Rivenbark. Humorous riffs on modern-day motherhood. How can you not love a book that discusses a trip to the pre-teen clothes department like this:

Now that my kid is practically of childbearing age [is six the new seventeen?] I must choose from ripped-on-purpose jeans and T-shirts that scream things like BABY DOLL and JAIL BAIT, not to mention a rather angry GIRLS RULE AND BOYS DROOL! where an embroidered flower with buzzing bee should be.

When did this happen? Who decided that my six-year-old should dress like a Vegas showgirl? And one with an abundance of anger issues at that?


Meaningless Statistics

In 2006, I read a total of 33 (I think) books, 20 of which were fiction (14 of which were mystery novels) and the rest nonfiction.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

I guess you don't consider knitting books, "reading."

I'm currently working my way through Arctic Lace and Skeleton Coast by Clive Cussler and Jack du Brul. I have to admit, I'd read anything by Donna Druchunas, but I won't be searching out anything else by the other authors.

Carol said...

Well, most of the time I just look at the pretty pictures.

For the same reason, I don't consider Playgirl reading.

Anonymous said...

What she said. Knitting books are not "reading" books.

I happen to know that Carol and I share very similar tastes in books, so I daresay we've read a few of the same mysteries. But I really liked The Historian and Running With Scissors. I would say I easily read 30 books this past year. I'll have to start keeping track of 2007's lot. I have a personal shopping day due at Borders. Almost as bad as yarn shopping.

Carol said...

Have you read A Very Long Engagement about solving the mystery whereabouts of 5 soldiers thrown out of a trench in WWI? Very good plus I just found out it was made into a movie with the chick from Amelie. Also just finished As Nature Made Him. Great non-fiction on modern medicine, gender identity and nature vs nuture arguments. Can send it to you if you'd like.

Deborah C. said...

I'll go with Marilyn - I adored The Historian. I read a lot due to a long commute (when I'm not knitting), I like mysteries. Knitting books aren't "reading" per se, they are either eye candy or study (i.e. learning new techniques). Carol, I totally agree with the Celia Rivenbark book - I detest clothes shopping for my 2 younger girls (9 and 4) because the clothes available are generally wildly inappropriate for their age level! I refuse to dress them as Britney wanna-bes.

Carol said...

I read The Historian -- it was a Christmas present last year from my MIL, and very much appreciated -- and I agree, it was good. Long, but it went fast because the pace was so good. I have not heard of A Very Long Engagement but I'll look for it at the library. Is the other one about the person who was born with inconclusive anatomy and raised as one gender when s/he actually felt like the other? I think I read a review of it somewhere but haven't gotten around to looking for it yet. Thanks, guys!

Sue in CT said...

I saw A Very Long Engagement. It was very good. I couldn't knit through it though as my French isn't that good. I'll have to find and read the book.

Have you read Suite Francais about the occupation of a small French village during WWII?

You might try Colin Cotterill for an offbeat mystery series.

Eileen said...

Where did you find the Stop Dressing Your Six-Year-Old Like A Skank? I have several mothers I would love to send this book to.

I too am hitting that challenging age for dressing my daughter. Thank God I can sew, now I just need to find more time.

Carol said...

I got it at our library -- it was in the new section, so I guess it hasn't been out that long. You could always try Amazon.com....

Thanks for the book recommendations!

Evelyn Wide-Load said...

I want to write the book "Stop dressing like a Six-Year-Old". My very dear friend at work has made me see the light. I've had to give up the baggy, shapeless dresses and the squishy uber-ugly shoes, with god-help-me, t-staps. I need to spread the word. 47 and a little chubby does not necessarily a frump make. YMMV, but for me, that train don't stop there anymore. Just sayin.

Laura said...

I am reminded of the time my mother, trying to buy a dress for my sister (who was about 11 at the time), called out "Is there anything here that a whore wouldn't wear" in the middle of the store....

My sister was mortified, but Mom had a point....